Bit intimidating

Posted by / 24-Jul-2017 18:54

Bit intimidating

Ponyboy comes to this conclusion at the end of the novel, as Johnny is dying.He understands Johnny’s value only when he is about to lose Johnny, which amplifies the pain of the loss.Randy’s belief in the permanence of their social identities may be based, however, in the fact that he is a Soc and not a greaser.Having grown up in a wealthy and comfortable environment, it would not be difficult for him to imagine himself forever stuck in this lifestyle.Ponyboy feels more comfortable with Soda, Darry, and Two-Bit because as a narrator, and later a writer, he is more comfortable with fictional heroes than with real people like Dally who have lost their innocence.

He says earlier that the other greasers—Soda, Darry, and Two-Bit—remind him more of the heroes in his books than Dally does.Ponyboy speaks these words in Chapter 5, during his stay with Johnny in the abandoned church in Windrixville.Pony’s realization stems from a comment Johnny makes after reading a passage from Gone with the Wind, in which he says that Dally reminds him of one of the gallant Southern gentlemen from the Civil War.His words speak to an important idea in the novel—the futility of the recurring Soc-greaser violence.The idea Randy presents here has another side to it, however.

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Dally does not scare him but rather fascinates him, and he holds a romanticized vision of Dally as an honorable Southern gentleman.

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